Richard Allen — A Poem

Andrea D. Price
2 min readFeb 14, 2023

His praying knees became weapons, so he learned to pray with his feet

He jumped on his wagon and sold salt during the Revolutionary War.
He preached to all who would listen, “Let’s study war no more.”

His praying knees became weapons, so he learned to pray with his feet

He walked along the east coast until his feet became bloody, bruised, and sore. He traveled from the city to the countryside and preached and preached even more.

His praying knees became weapons, so he learned to pray with his feet

He walked to Southwark and Northern Liberty in Philly, preaching four to five times a day. He tried to build a church for worship, but opposition got in the way.

His praying knees became weapons, so he learned to pray with his feet

He ran with Absalom Jones; they partnered to get things done. Together they formed the Free African Society to ensure Africans had funds.

His praying knees became weapons, so he learned to pray with his feet

He walked to St. George’s with other Africans, where they hoped to pray. After falling on their knees and giving God their pleas, they were asked to go away.

His praying knees became weapons, so he learned to pray with his feet

He and others ran from St. George’s, prayed, and worshiped God as they pleased. They built a new “House of Worship,” to God they had to cleave.

His praying knees became weapons, so he learned to pray with his feet

He walked to an old blacksmith’s shop, bought it, and moved it to a new place. He turned it into the “House of God,” and it became African Methodism’s home base.

His praying knees became weapons, so he learned to pray with his feet.

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